How to find the real of shadow on your make up

unduhan-49It’s easy to get stuck in a rut, wearing the same color palette on your eyes every day, and one the most common questions we receive at Beautylish is, “How do I make my eyes pop?” If you’re tired of the usual eye color–shadow pairings, we’re here to show you some alluring and unexpected shades that will give your peepers the attention they deserve. Tip: Start with an eyelid primer like Too Faced Shadow Insurance (which we used with all looks here). It’ll make your color more vivid and intense, and help the pigment stay put.

For Green Eyes

Sunset undertones like bold amber bring out the yellow and teal nuances in verdant eyes. Green and orange are split complementary on the color wheel, so they intensify one another without clashing. We blended a copper cream shadow all over the lid and in the corners, and accented with a copper loose powder.

We used: rms beauty Cream Eye Shadow in Solar, Sugarpill Cosmetics Loose Eyeshadow in Asylum

For Hazel Eyes

Hazel eyes can pretty much rock any color with confidence. But our favorite vibrant pick? A royal blue hue! A clean blue liner brightens up camouflage-colored irises and brings out any exotic amber and yellow undertones when smudged on the waterline.

For Blue Eyes

Since sapphire eyes are such a statement on their own, many with blue eyes don’t often venture into the world of vivid eye makeup. But if you’re looking for a subtle splash of color, try a wash of magenta or fuchsia shadow. Think Elizabeth Taylor, electrified!

We used: Inglot Cosmetics Freedom System Eye Shadow in 382 Matte and 449 Pearl, plus Inglot Cosmetics AMC Face Blush in 62 over the top for an extra hot-pink pop.

For Brown Eyes

Brown-eyed people can pull off any color from brights to pastels, but took a step back with a desaturated slate look. Gray sometimes gets a bad rap, but the shade really transforms brown eyes—silvery tones contrast with the warmth, and intensify any amber tones. The overall effect is multi-dimensional; essentially, a slightly shimmery, pewter smoky eye.